Paul Dewar: Great Canadian Dyslexic

As a child, Paul Dewar sometimes felt like an outsider, but his experience with dyslexia ultimately helped him to become an effective advocate for others. And for a decade, he served as as one of Canada’s most respected MPs.

Top 18 in 2018: The year dyslexia pride was born

2018. It was a banner year for dyslexia awareness. The trend towards “neurodiversity”, “inclusion” and […]

No Rolling Stone, we can’t just “chill out”

Help me, can’t somebody help me? asks Canadian singer-song writer Sean Mendes in his gorgeous, […]

Photo by Miranda Kate Photography

My dyslexia portrait: reading anxiety, fear and fatigue

Sounds funny for a writer, but it’s been impossible for me to find the right […]

Survey says: Canadian youth with mental health and learning disabilities less likely to be in school or employed

Statistics Canada has just released the results of the 2017 Canadian Survey on Disabilities (2017). It shines a light on the prevalence and impact of mental health and learning disabilities in Canadian youth.

New study: Chatting with your child may promote early literacy

A new American study published in Pediatrics journal finds that conversing with your young child is beneficial to the acquisition of language skills. But don’t expect it to prevent dyslexia.

Building a better future: #infirstperson interview with Brandon Ayash

This is Brandon Ayash’s story. Now 35 years old, he’s looking to change his narrative. He’s a bright, creative, articulate and hard working person who wants to build a better career for himself. Along the way, he hopes to make the world a better place for children.

Bill C-81: MP describes barriers facing dyslexic Canadians

Parliament Hill. Not just a tourist destination, the place where democracy lives. I grew up […]

6 things that scare dyslexics

It isn’t scary having dyslexia. What’s scary is the lack of understanding and support for […]

Hiding in plain sight: The hidden homeless and invisible disabilities

The “hidden homeless” are hiding in plain sight. In Canada, 1 in 10 people can’t find permanent housing. They live with friends or family, sleep in cars or rooming houses. The risk of hidden homelessness is 2x greater for someone with a disability, and even higher for those with a learning disability. The statistics are alarming, and yet, the needs of those with disabilities are rendered invisible in emergency housing services and homeless shelters. No excuses. We–you–need to make those connections. And here’s why…