Book review: On reading My Dyslexia, or five reasons I love this book

“This much is clear: The mind of the dyslexic is different from the minds of other people. Learning that my problem with processing language wasn’t stupidity seemed to take most of my life.” ~Philip Schultz, My Dyslexia

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My Dyslexia (2011) by Philip Schultz is on the top of my reading list for 2017. I’ve already read it a few times, underlining the good bits and reading it out loud to whoever will listen. And I will read it again, and again, and again.

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2017: It’s time for change!

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As a parent, I struggle daily to ensure my daughter gets the help she needs to learn and be happy at school. Some days I succeed, other days are a miserable failure. It hurts to see her suffer needlessly.

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Happy new year, happy reading!

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They say knowledge is power, so I’ve got quite the stack of books to read in 2017. I’ve got memoir, psychology, science, self-help and non-fiction. The subject? Mostly about dyslexia and brain science, with a strong serving of inspirational stories. I may not be the woman who changes her brain, but I’m down with right-brainers ruling the future!

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Photo essay: Understanding dyslexia—the first Canadian conference

More than 200 parents, students, educators and advocates attended the first Canadian dyslexia conference on Nov. 12, 2016 in Toronto. If you missed it, here’s a chance to see what the day looked like:

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Annette Sang, a founding member of of Decoding Dyslexia Ontario and Elaine Keenan, president of the Ontario Branch – International Dyslexia Association, set the tone for the day with a powerful opening statement: “It’s a human right to learn to read.”

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What students with dyslexia want you to know

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The student panel at the 2016 dyslexia conference in Toronto blew the audience away with their eloquent and inspiring presentation (if Richard Branson is looking for future executives, look no further!). By sharing their stories, they are helping to empower a generation of children and youth. Thank you! Continue reading

My dyslexic journey: Personal reflections on Canada’s first dyslexia conference

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This is the sign, along with an army of volunteers, that greeted me at the first Canadian conference on dyslexia in Toronto last weekend.

It’s not everyday you get to be part of a historic “first”, especially when it involves a topic that is near and dear to your heart. I was not alone; the sense of urgency was tangible at this sold-out event.

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Support children with dyslexia: Sign the petition!

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With early identification and effective teaching, dyslexic children can learn to read and succeed at school. Without it, they suffer the stress and shame that comes with struggling to read and write. Without it, they won’t reach their full potential.

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Top 10 Halloween costumes for dyslexics

Halloween is here! If you’re dyslexic, you’re in luck. There are lots of great costumes you can wear to celebrate your dyslexic strengths and honour your dyslexic heroes.

1. Super hero. Dress up as yourself!! Unpack your cape and tights, and unleash your incredible dyslexic super powers: brave, resilient, persistent, creative, super smart, change makers. Continue reading