You asked: Which of the following scenarios would qualify for Hardy Weinberg equilibrium?

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What is the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium used to describe quizlet?

Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium: the condition in which both allele and genotype frequencies in a population remain constant from generation to generation unless specific disturbances occur.

How do you know if Hardy-Weinberg is in equilibrium?

To know if a population is in Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium scientists have to observe at least two generations. If the allele frequencies are the same for both generations then the population is in Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium.

What are the 4 conditions of Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium?

The Hardy-Weinberg model states that a population will remain at genetic equilibrium as long as five conditions are met: (1) No change in the DNA sequence, (2) No migration, (3) A very large population size, (4) Random mating, and (5) No natural selection.

Which of the following are conditions for Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium quizlet?

The conditions to maintain the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium are: no mutation, no gene flow, large population size, random mating, and no natural selection. The Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium can be disrupted by deviations from any of its five main underlying conditions.

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What does the Hardy-Weinberg model show?

The Hardy-Weinberg principle states that a population’s allele and genotype frequencies will remain constant in the absence of evolutionary mechanisms. Ultimately, the Hardy-Weinberg principle models a population without evolution under the following conditions: no mutations. no immigration/emigration.

What are the assumptions of Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium quizlet?

The Hardy-Weinberg model makes the following assumptions: no selection at the gene in question; no genetic drift; no gene flow; no mutation; random mating.

What are the five assumptions that the Hardy-Weinberg formula uses to calculate traits within a population?

A low rate of mutations would help keep a population in equilibrium. The five assumptions of Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium are a large population size, no natural selection, no mutation rate, no genetic drift, and random mating.

How do you find the Hardy Weinberg allele frequency?

To calculate the allelic frequencies we simply divide the number of S or F alleles by the total number of alleles: 94/128 = 0.734 = p = frequency of the S allele, and 34/128 = 0.266 = q = frequency of the F allele.

How do you find the equilibrium frequency?

Now solve for p and convince yourself that the equilibrium frequency = p = v/(u+v). Similarly the equilibrium frequency of q = u/(u+v).