Which of the following factors will not affect Hardy Weinberg equilibrium?

Which of the following factors affect Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium?

– Five factors are known to influence the equilibrium of Hardy-Weinberg. These include gene migration or gene flow, genetic drift, mutation, genetic recombination and natural selection.

Which of the following does not belong to factors affecting the Hardy Weinberg principle?

1. Which of the following does not belong to the Hardy Weinberg principle? Explanation: Allele frequencies does not vary from species to species. In a population, the frequency always remains fixed or constant according to Hardy Weinberg principle.

What are the factors that affect allele frequency and how they are affected?

Five factors are known to affect allele frequency in populations i.e., Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. These are gene migration or gene flow, genetic drift, mutation, genetic recombination and natural selection.

What idea did Hardy and Weinberg disprove?

They disproved the idea that dominant alleles’ percentages will rise throughout generations, which causes recessive alleles’ percentages to sink.

What does it mean if a population is not in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium?

If the allele frequencies after one round of random mating change at all from the original frequencies, the population is not in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and evolution has occurred within the population.

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What factors affect allele frequency?

Population genetics is the study of the allele frequency distribution and change under the influence of the 4 evolutionary forces: natural selection, mutation, migration (gene flow), and genetic drift.

What factors affected population frequency?

Five factors are known to affect Hardy- Weinberg genetic equilibrium such as genetic drift, gene flow, mutation, non-random mating and natural selection.

What are the factors that affect the gene frequencies?

role in natural selection

Gene frequencies tend to remain constant from generation to generation when disturbing factors are not present. Factors that disturb the natural equilibrium of gene frequencies include mutation, migration (or gene flow), random genetic drift, and natural selection.