How are the brains of people with autism different?

Is the brain of an autistic person different?

The brains of people with autism show a variety of structural differences from those of controls, according to a large imaging study1. The differences appear throughout the brain, not just in regions linked to the condition. The findings suggest that many more regions are involved in autism than previously thought.

In what ways do autistic people think differently?

People with autism are “details-before-the-concept” thinkers, while non-autistic people are “concept-before-the-details” thinkers. What this means is that the autistic mind approaches their environment—a bottom-up approach—while the non-autistic mind utilizes top-down thinking—drawing on prior learning and memories.

How autistic brains are wired differently?

The researchers found that there were significant differences in the length of the connections between regions of the brain when they compared people with autism to those without. The minimum length of these connections in the cortical gray matter was dubbed “wiring costs” by the researchers.

What does autism affect in the brain?

A brain-tissue study suggests that children affected by autism have a surplus of synapses, or connections between brain cells. The excess is due to a slowdown in the normal pruning process that occurs during brain development, researchers say.

What part of the brain is damaged in autism?

The cerebellum is one of the key brain regions affected by autism. The researchers found that neurons that lacked the RNF8 protein formed about 50 percent more synapses — the connections that allow neurons to send signals from one to another — than those with the gene. And the extra synapses worked.

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Can you see autism on a brain scan?

It found that a brain scan and computer algorithm using five different measurements of brain shape and structure was up to 85% accurate in identifying the autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) in adults. These measurements could be used as a “biomarker” for autistic spectrum disorders, the researchers say.

How do ADHD brains develop differently?

They found that brain size was different between the two groups. Children with ADHD had smaller brains by about 3 percent , although it is important to point out that intelligence is not affected by brain size. The researchers also reported that brain development was the same in children with or without ADHD.