Why do bacterial cells not need telomeres?

Why do eukaryotes need telomeres but bacteria do not?

To prevent the loss of genes as chromosome ends wear down, the tips of eukaryotic chromosomes have specialized DNA “caps” called telomeres. … Telomeres need to be protected from a cell’s DNA repair systems because they have single-stranded overhangs, which “look like” damaged DNA.

Why are telomeres not needed in prokaryotes?

The “end replication problem” is exclusive to linear chromosomes as circular chromosomes do not have ends lying without reach of DNA-polymerases. Most prokaryotes, relying on circular chromosomes, accordingly do not possess telomeres.

Do bacterial cells have a telomeres?

The bacterial telomeres constitute a functional analogue of eukaryotic telomeres by preventing chromosomal ends from progressive shortening and loss of genetic information through successive replication rounds. … ‘Atypical’ telomeres (e.g. including those of plasmids such as SCP1 of S.

Why are telomeres necessary in eukaryotes but not found in prokaryotes?

Eukaryotes have solved the end-replication problem by locating highly repeated DNA sequence at the end, or telomeres, of each linear chromosome. … In prokaryotes, the end-replication problem is solved by having circular DNA molecules as chromosomes. Another cause of telomere shortening is oxidative stress.

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What happens to the cell if there are no more telomeres?

They protect the ends of our chromosomes by forming a cap, much like the plastic tip on shoelaces. If the telomeres were not there, our chromosomes may end up sticking to other chromosomes. … Without telomeres, important DNA would be lost every time a cell divides (usually about 50 to 70 times).

What are the telomeres and why are they important?

Telomeres, the specific DNA–protein structures found at both ends of each chromosome, protect genome from nucleolytic degradation, unnecessary recombination, repair, and interchromosomal fusion. Telomeres therefore play a vital role in preserving the information in our genome.

Why is telomerase not active in somatic cells?

Telomerase activity is absent in most normal human somatic cells because of the lack of expression of TERT; TERC is usually present. On the other hand most mouse cells have telomerase activity (Blasco, 2005). … The absence of telomerase activity in most human somatic cells results in telomere shortening during aging.

What are telomeres and why are they important how does telomerase play a role quizlet?

Telomerase allows for telomere length and equilibrium maintenance by adding on repeats to the end of the chromosome. … RNA component – contains a sequence that is complementary to the telomere sequence that is added. This template region can be used to add to the ends of the chromosomes.

Why are telomeres present at the ends of eukaryotic chromosomes?

Telomeres are the physical ends of eukaryotic chromosomes. They protect chromosome ends from DNA degradation, recombination, and DNA end fusions, and they are important for nuclear architecture. Telomeres provide a mechanism for their replication by semiconservative DNA replication and length maintenance by telomerase.

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What cells do not have telomeres?

Since first discovered in Tetrahymena thermophila in 1985 (82), telomerase activity was found to be absent in most normal human somatic cells but present in over 90% of cancerous cells and in vitro-immortalized cells (124, 210).

What is the telomere problem?

Abstract. Telomeres are complex nucleoprotein structures that protect the extremities of linear chromosomes. Telomere replication is a major challenge because many obstacles to the progression of the replication fork are concentrated at the ends of the chromosomes. This is known as the telomere replication problem.