What will happen to the homologous chromosome pairs at anaphase 1?

What happens to chromosomes during anaphase 1?

Anaphase I: In anaphase I, the attachment of the spindle fibers is complete. The homologous chromosomes are pulled apart and move towards opposite ends of the cell. Do not confuse this with the pulling apart of sister chromatids! This is the point in which reduction occurs with 23 chromosomes moving to each pole.

Are there homologous pairs in anaphase 1?

In metaphase I, the homologous pairs of chromosomes align on either side of the equatorial plate. Then, in anaphase I, the spindle fibers contract and pull the homologous pairs, each with two chromatids, away from each other and toward each pole of the cell. During telophase I, the chromosomes are enclosed in nuclei.

What would happen if one of the pairs of chromosomes don’t separate during anaphase 1?

One daughter cell thus ends up with more chromosomes in its nucleus than the other. Likewise, abnormal separation can occur in meiosis when homologous pairs fail to separate during anaphase I. This also results in daughter cells with different numbers of chromosomes.

What would happen if one of the pairs of chromosomes didn’t separate during anaphase 1?

During anaphase, sister chromatids (or homologous chromosomes for meiosis I), will separate and move to opposite poles of the cell, pulled by microtubules. In nondisjunction, the separation fails to occur causing both sister chromatids or homologous chromosomes to be pulled to one pole of the cell.

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When the chromosomes come together as homologous pairs?

During prophase I, the pairs of homologous chromosomes come together to form a tetrad or bivalent, which contains four chromatids. Recombination can occur between any two chromatids within this tetrad structure.