What happens during prophase LL?

What exactly happens during prophase L?

The first and longest phase of mitosis is prophase. During prophase, chromatin condenses into chromosomes , and the nuclear envelope, or membrane, breaks down. In animal cells, the centrioles near the nucleus begin to separate and move to opposite poles (sides) of the cell.

Does Crossing Over happen in prophase LL?

Crossing over does not occur during prophase II; it only occurs during prophase I. In prophase II, there are still two copies of each gene, but they are on sister chromatids within a single chromosome (rather than homologous chromosomes as in prophase I).

What does prophase II mean?

Prophase II is the phase that follows after meiosis I, or after interkinesis if present. If interkinesis takes place, the nuclear envelope and the nucleolus disintegrate during prophase II. The chromosomes are condensed. The centrosomes replicate and move towards the opposite poles. … prophase.

What changes occur during prophase?

During prophase the nucleoli disappear and the chromatin fibers thicken and shorten to form discrete chromosomes visible with the light microscope. Each replicated chromosome appears as two identical chromatids joined at the centromere.

What does independent assortment mean?

The Principle of Independent Assortment describes how different genes independently separate from one another when reproductive cells develop. … During meiosis, the pairs of homologous chromosome are divided in half to form haploid cells, and this separation, or assortment, of homologous chromosomes is random.

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What happens during telophase?

Telophase is the fifth and final phase of mitosis, the process that separates the duplicated genetic material carried in the nucleus of a parent cell into two identical daughter cells. … During telophase, a nuclear membrane forms around each set of chromosomes to separate the nuclear DNA from the cytoplasm.

How does segregation happen during anaphase 2?

There are two ways in which non-disjunction can occur: 1) both homologous chromosomes migrate together to one pole instead of separating to opposite poles in Anaphase I or 2) sister chromatids fail to separate properly and both sister chromatids move together to one pole instead of to opposite poles in Anaphase II.