Best answer: How is genomics used to treat diseases?

How is genomics used in medicine?

Genomic medicine is the study of our genes (DNA) and their interaction with our health. Genomics investigates how a person’s biological information can be used to improve their clinical care and health outcomes (eg through effective diagnosis and personalised treatment.

How would you use genomic information to treat patients?

Using genomic data, providers can identify patients who are at high risk of developing certain conditions and better plan for treatments. This approach could be particularly helpful in proactively treating cognitive or behavioral disorders before people show signs of disease.

What can Genomics be used for?

Genomic technologies are increasingly being used to understand the contribution of both rare and common genetic factors to the development of common diseases, such as high blood pressure, diabetes and cancer.

How has the human genome project helped with the treatment of some diseases?

A huge breakthrough in medicine has been the ability to sequence the DNA in cancer cells. The sequence can be compared to the sequence found by the Human Genome Project. This allows scientists to work out which genes are mutated and this gives them ideas for developing medicines.

How is genome sequencing used in healthcare?

The goal of sequencing is to identify genetic variants that have known impacts on health and disease. However, sequencing results have variable clinical relevance to patients’ and providers’ decision making and to patients’ outcomes.

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What is genomic Healthcare?

Genomic medicine is an emerging medical discipline that involves using genomic information about an individual as part of their clinical care (e.g. for diagnostic or therapeutic decision-making) and the health outcomes and policy implications of that clinical use.

Why is genomics important in healthcare?

Genomic medicine has the potential to make genetic diagnosis of disease a more efficient and cost-effective process, by reducing genetic testing to a single analysis, which then informs individuals throughout life.