Category: blog

Monday motivation for dyslexics and those who love us

Need a shot of positivity with your Monday coffee? Keep reading! For dyslexics and our […]

What type of dyslexic are you? Candid, closet or confused?

A 2009 study found that the majority of adult dyslexics hide their dyslexia. Why? To […]

“Hacking” the dyslexic brain

      Inventors have long been experimenting with technology to make reading and learning […]

The dyslexic journey: Not all those who wander are lost

I love this quote because it describes exactly how I feel about being dyslexic. My […]

Sunday book review: Dyslexia is my superpower (most of the time)

My own daughter taught me: dyslexic children are very good at telling you what they need to learn. Margaret Rooke’s book “Dyslexia is my superpower (most of the time)” gives these kids a voice. We need to listen.

When I tell you I’m dyslexic as illustrated in owl photos

In the time it takes to say “I’m dyslexic,” I go from being a “normal” person” to being a “disabled,” “special” and occasionally even “cool” person in your eyes. Your reaction and how it makes me feel.

Using neuroscience to design effective reading programs: An interview with Dr. Devin Kearns

Education researchers like Dr. Devin Kearns are using neuroscience to design reading programs that work specifically for the dyslexic brain.

My brain on dyslexia

When I was little, I spent many happy hours inside my head. I was the […]

Why we need to name dyslexia: BBC interview with Professor Maggie Snowling

What is dyslexia and why do we need to “name it’? A BBC radio 4 with Professor Maggie Snowling.

What science is telling us: Do dyslexic brains work differently? What reading instruction works best?

Neuroscience is painting an interesting picture of the dyslexic brain, and how it processes information. A new report, The Neurobiology of Dyslexia, has brought together the best of neuroscience with the best of reading science to show how the dyslexic brain works when reading, and how effective reading instruction can change the brain.