Watch: New animated short film #IAmDyslexic

16910885_10211477931764647_495023852_o-1500x791.jpg

“Remember, you are not alone.”

That is the empowering message of I AM DYSLEXIC – a gorgeous animated short film just released on YouTube for all the world to see and share.

The award-winning film was directed and produced by Mads Johan Øgaard and Katie Wyman. They are both talented and creative dyslexics – their successful film making a reminder that dyslexia needn’t hold you back from achieving your dreams.

The film was made with no budget and a team of more than 60 students most of which have dyslexia and other learning differences.

Continue reading

International Day of Persons with Disabilities: Can you see me?

invisible-disability

I have a learning disability difference. You can’t see it, but it’s real.

I felt its sting when I was a child in school, when you asked me to read out loud, when you told me I’d never learn math, when you said I’d never go to university. As an adult, I see it every time I pick up a book, read a recipe, write an essay, fill out tax forms, drive my car or go for a job interview.

It hasn’t always been easy, but I have adapted.

The hardest part is how you see me – and how you don’t.

My disability difference is dyslexia, the most common learning disability difference in the world. It affects an estimated 15-20% of the population across every race, culture, class and gender.

And yet, dyslexia is largely unknown, unsupported and ignored. Some days, I feel we are invisible. Other days, I feel we are completely misunderstood.

Continue reading

Why our schools need to say dyslexia

10400328_1090364990195_824773_n

Me at three.

I remember this day clearly. I insisted on dressing myself. Mismatched mittens and wrongly buttoned sweater — it didn’t matter. I was pleased with the results. My father took this photo, a celebration of his fiercely independent child.

Me at three.

Happy, free, loved, accepted.

My life before school. At home with a mom and dad who let me be me.

All that changed, I changed, when I entered the Ontario school system.

Continue reading

My #dyslexia story. Something lost. Something found.

I was identified as dyslexic at the age of 49. It was like finding the missing piece of an unfinished puzzle (to paraphrase Steven Spielberg). Finally, my life made sense. In the days that followed, I did what I always do: I wrote it out. Then, I published my story on my book blog Lost and Found Books.

Here is my dyslexia story. Something lost, something found. Continue reading

Summer reading

DSC00127.JPG

The Dyslexic Library is on vacation, and we’re reading:

51BPsomYd0L._SX360_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

Relish: My life in the kitchen (2013) – – graphic novel by Lucy Knisley – our number one pick of the summer!!! – tells the story of a woman’s (the author) life, and lessons learned about food, cooking and life – she was raised in a very foodie environment and grew up to take a completely different path – includes recipes – beautiful illustrations and beautiful story – recommended for teenagers and adults – writer has web comic (Review by SH & AMB) Continue reading

2017: It’s time for change!

keithgraymeme.jpg

As a parent, I struggle daily to ensure my daughter gets the help she needs to learn and be happy at school. Some days I succeed, other days are a miserable failure. It hurts to see her suffer needlessly.

Continue reading

Photo essay: Understanding dyslexia—the first Canadian conference

More than 200 parents, students, educators and advocates attended the first Canadian dyslexia conference on Nov. 12, 2016 in Toronto. If you missed it, here’s a chance to see what the day looked like:

dsc07947

Annette Sang, a founding member of of Decoding Dyslexia Ontario and Elaine Keenan, president of the Ontario Branch – International Dyslexia Association, set the tone for the day with a powerful opening statement: “It’s a human right to learn to read.”

Continue reading

My dyslexic journey: Personal reflections on Canada’s first dyslexia conference

dsc07914

This is the sign, along with an army of volunteers, that greeted me at the first Canadian conference on dyslexia in Toronto last weekend.

It’s not everyday you get to be part of a historic “first”, especially when it involves a topic that is near and dear to your heart. I was not alone; the sense of urgency was tangible at this sold-out event.

Continue reading

Support children with dyslexia: Sign the petition!

OfCTNxCveJfujjW-800x450-noPad.jpg

With early identification and effective teaching, dyslexic children can learn to read and succeed at school. Without it, they suffer the stress and shame that comes with struggling to read and write. Without it, they won’t reach their full potential.

Continue reading

New video: Faces of dyslexia

dyslexia-video

After spending most of my life living in the shadow of undiagnosed dyslexia, I am starting to feel really hopeful about increasing dyslexia awareness and support in Canada.

This–the first–video by Decoding Dyslexia Ontario is a sign of the changing times:

“These are the faces and wise words of some of our young people in Ontario who are spreading the word about dyslexia and helping us understand what we can do to help them succeed in school and in life.” ~Decoding Dyslexia Ontario
Take a look at the inspiring faces of dyslexia in Ontario, Canada. And share!