Category: Accommodations

Monday motivation: Summer edition

When I started this feature, I wasn’t sure how much content I’d have to share. […]

F is for fail

“A child has to try and fail to read for several years before being diagnosed.” […]

Sunday book review: Dyslexia is my superpower (most of the time)

My own daughter taught me: dyslexic children are very good at telling you what they need to learn. Margaret Rooke’s book “Dyslexia is my superpower (most of the time)” gives these kids a voice. We need to listen.

When I tell you I’m dyslexic as illustrated in owl photos

In the time it takes to say “I’m dyslexic,” I go from being a “normal” person” to being a “disabled,” “special” and occasionally even “cool” person in your eyes. Your reaction and how it makes me feel.

Why we need to name dyslexia: BBC interview with Professor Maggie Snowling

What is dyslexia and why do we need to “name it’? A BBC radio 4 with Professor Maggie Snowling.

Disability inclusion: A little less conversation, a little more action

Disability inclusion: A little less conversation, a little more action. That’s the message driving Valuable 500—a global movement putting disability on the agenda of business leaders.

Photo by Miranda Kate Photography

My dyslexia portrait: reading anxiety, fear and fatigue

Sounds funny for a writer, but it’s been impossible for me to find the right […]

Survey says: Canadian youth with mental health and learning disabilities less likely to be in school or employed

Statistics Canada has just released the results of the 2017 Canadian Survey on Disabilities (2017). It shines a light on the prevalence and impact of mental health and learning disabilities in Canadian youth.

6 things that scare dyslexics

It isn’t scary having dyslexia. What’s scary is the lack of understanding and support for […]

Hiding in plain sight: The hidden homeless and invisible disabilities

The “hidden homeless” are hiding in plain sight. In Canada, 1 in 10 people can’t find permanent housing. They live with friends or family, sleep in cars or rooming houses. The risk of hidden homelessness is 2x greater for someone with a disability, and even higher for those with a learning disability. The statistics are alarming, and yet, the needs of those with disabilities are rendered invisible in emergency housing services and homeless shelters. No excuses. We–you–need to make those connections. And here’s why…